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-rw-r--r--docs/buildroot-documentation.html63
1 files changed, 31 insertions, 32 deletions
diff --git a/docs/buildroot-documentation.html b/docs/buildroot-documentation.html
index 35b824a7c5..8897ff67ea 100644
--- a/docs/buildroot-documentation.html
+++ b/docs/buildroot-documentation.html
@@ -292,7 +292,7 @@
skeleton.</li>
</ul>
- <p>Each directory contains at least 3 files :</p>
+ <p>Each directory contains at least 2 files :</p>
<ul>
<li><code>something.mk</code> is the Makefile that downloads, configures,
@@ -302,10 +302,6 @@
description file. It describes the option related to the current
software.</li>
- <li><code>Makefile.in</code> is a part of Makefile that sets various
- variables according to the configuration given through the configuration
- tool. For most tools it simply involves adding the name of the tool to
- the <code>TARGETS</code> variable.</li>
</ul>
<p>The main Makefile do the job through the following steps (once the
@@ -343,9 +339,10 @@
<code>target/default/target_skeleton</code> and then removes useless
<code>CVS/</code> directories.</li>
- <li>Make the <code>TARGETS</code> dependency. This is where all the job
- is done : all <code>Makefile.in</code> files "subscribe" targets into
- this global variable, so that the needed tools gets compiled.</li>
+ <li>Add the <code>TARGETS</code> dependency. This should generally check
+ if the configuration option for this package is enabled, and if so then
+ "subscribe" this package to be compiled by adding it to the TARGETS
+ global variable.</li>
</ol>
<h2><a name="using_toolchain" id="using_toolchain"></a>Using the
@@ -441,26 +438,6 @@ config BR2_PACKAGE_FOO
<p>Of course, you can add other options to configure particular
things in your software.</p>
- <h3><code>Makefile.in</code> file</h3>
-
- <p>Then, write a <code>Makefile.in</code> file. Basically, this is
- a very short <i>Makefile</i> that adds the name of the software to
- the list of <code>TARGETS</code> that Buildroot will generate. In
- fact, the name of the software is the the identifier of the target
- inside the real <i>Makefile</i> that will do everything (download,
- compile, install), and that we study below. Back to
- <code>Makefile.in</code>, here is an example :</p>
-
-<pre>
-ifeq ($(strip $(BR2_PACKAGE_FOO)),y)
-TARGETS+=foo
-endif
-</pre>
-
- <p>As you can see, this short <i>Makefile</i> simply adds the
- target <code>foo</code> to the list of targets handled by Buildroot
- if software <i>foo</i> was selected using the configuration tool.</p>
-
<h3>The real <i>Makefile</i></h3>
<p>Finally, here's the hardest part. Create a file named
@@ -520,6 +497,15 @@ endif
48 foo-dirclean:
49 rm -rf $(FOO_DIR)
50
+ 51 #############################################################
+ 52 #
+ 53 # Toplevel Makefile options
+ 54 #
+ 55 #############################################################
+ 56 ifeq ($(strip $(BR2_PACKAGE_FOO)),y)
+ 57 TARGETS+=foo
+ 58 endif
+
</pre>
<p>First of all, this <i>Makefile</i> example works for a single
@@ -602,11 +588,13 @@ endif
removed to save space.</p>
<p>Line 40 defines the main target of the software, the one
- referenced in the <code>Makefile.in</code> file. This targets
- should first of all depends on the dependecies of the software (in
- our example, <i>uclibc</i> and <i>ncurses</i>), and then to the
+ that will be eventually be used by the top level
+ <code>Makefile</code> to download, compile, and then install
+ this package. This target should first of all depends on all
+ needed dependecies of the software (in our example,
+ <i>uclibc</i> and <i>ncurses</i>), and also depend on the
final binary. This last dependency will call all previous
- dependencies in the right order. </p>
+ dependencies in the correct order. </p>
<p>Line 42 defines a simple target that only downloads the code
source. This is not used during normal operation of Buildroot, but
@@ -619,6 +607,17 @@ endif
directory in which the software was uncompressed, configured and
compiled.</p>
+ <p>Lines 51-58 adds the target <code>foo</code> to the list
+ of targets to be compiled by Buildroot by first checking if
+ the configuration option for this package has been enabled
+ using the configuration tool, and if so then "subscribes"
+ this package to be compiled by adding it to the TARGETS
+ global variable. The name added to the TARGETS global
+ variable is the name of this package's target, as defined on
+ line 40, which is used by Buildroot to download, compile, and
+ then install this package.</p>
+
+
<h3>Conclusion</h3>
<p>As you can see, adding a software to buildroot is simply a